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This week, we record on Monday rather than Friday which gives us an extra two days to make the podcast even more timely…

Gini starts off by noting Twitter is planning to cut down on spam, and that includes those #FollowFriday or #FF tweets with long lists of @names and nothing else.  She says people will have to look at new ways to approach #FF. She chooses to write a weekly blog post featuring reasons to follow someone, like this one for Shel Holtz.

She goes on to mention Facebook’s new questions app, which apparently everyone has but Martin. Joe asks a question on FB and within four minutes gets 11 responses. (Note: by responding to Joe’s FB Q, Martin’s feature is enabled).  The way it works is you can pose a question, add answers folks can select, or let people provide their own answer. Gini feels it could be a good tool for market research and points out one change similar to a Quora feature: no one should be able to edit your question or answer. Currently, Facebook questions allows other users to edit the question and answers, this can result in your question longer representing your original point. Joe says he likes the social element of Quora and isn’t sure about the value of the FB experiment.

Martin recaps a recent post about what to look for – and what to avoid – when you’re choosing an agency. Joe mentions he feels the post points out that social media is in the broader context of overall effective communications, which is where it should be.

Joe announces that (sadly), our talented producer Yasmine Kashefi is leaving Thornley Fallis to go client-side. Yasmine has done a superb job on the show and we all want to thank her and wish her all the best!  We’ll miss you and hope you’ll send us some comments and thoughts.

Do you have comments? Send us an email or an audio comment to [email protected], join the Inside PR Facebook group, leave us a comment here, message us @inside_pr on Twitter, or connect with Gini Dietrich, Joe Thornley, and Martin Waxman on Twitter.

Our theme music was created by Damon de Szegheo; Roger Dey is our announcer.

This week’s episode was produced by Kristine Simpson.

Comments

  1. Sal

    @Martin – I too had “question” issues – only, none of my friends were using questions for me to answer. I would have answered one of the Inside PR questions, but I am still waiting to get approved 😉

    Anyway, I have a question for you guys – I have an idea for a PR campaign, but I am not sure how to 1) Research to see if there is already something in place and 2) begin to approach the parties to pitch the idea…

    Background:
    My little girl is turning 5 in August, she is currently enrolled in a private school to get a jump start in K4. Kindergarten (which she will be in, come fall) is mandatory. We weren’t notified by any means of the registration deadline for public schools until AFTER the deadline had passed. Shouldn’t the schools work with local hospitals and maybe even Babies R’ Us or something to put a mailing list together so school districts can mail parents who have up-coming school age children to get them registered? You could even get local stores in on the action and add some coupons for back-to-school supplies.

    Sorry for the bit of a rant, but would love to propose this to a few of the listed parties and get something like this going – just don’t know where to start. Any advice? (If you can point me to a past link, you don’t need to re-hash on the podcast)

    Love the show, keep up the great work!

  2. How nice to get a name-check in Inside PR – two, in fact! I recently re-subscribed after drifting away for a while and I’m definitely enjoying the new format.

    The discussion about Twitter auto-DMs in this episode had me nodding in vigorous agreement. One of the things that incenses me is when an auto-DM says something like “Check out my blog/LinkedIn/Facebook page…”

    See – if I’ve already chosen to follow you, chances are I’ve ALREADY checked out at least one if not all of those other channels, and that’s why I’ve determined you’re probably worth following. Isn’t that what everybody does?

    The suggestion in these messages seems to be that I’m following based solely on the quality of your last handful of epigrammatic bon mots and the ironic, self-mocking tone of your Twitter bio – and that would be just foolish.

    Bah.

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