Inside PR 423: Has Big Tech Become Too Powerful?

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We’re back after a brief end of summer hiatus and start off with this week’s #IPRMustKnow segment.

Martin: Signal, Facebook’s new app for FB and Instagram, gives journalists a set of tools to discover breaking news, curate visuals and stories and share them on various platforms.

Gini: Google and Twitter have teamed up to provide an open-source competitor to Facebook’s Instant Articles, a place for publishers to display breaking news on mobile.

Joe – How do you spell Google Reader? Apple News. Joe gives an overview of the much-touted app. He likes the visual interface but doesn’t think it’s a replacement for an RSS reader yet. And he offers a quick hack on how to get the app if you’re not in the U.S. – but you’ll have to listen to the show to get it :).

And our talk of the big three – Apple, Google and Facebook – brings us to our main topic: a New York Times op-ed by Berkeley prof Robert Reich called, Big Tech Has Become Way Too Powerful. Reich contends Facebook, Google and Apple have too much influence over the government and regulators and the way we discover news and content.

Listen for our discussion. And please send your thoughts. We’re interested to hear what you think.

We end by answering a question Barbara Nixon posed on Facebook and Twitter: ‘What should new PR pros expect and prepare for when interviewing for an entry-level PR position?’

Gini wants to hear where people see themselves in five years and where their career path is heading.

Joe tries to have a conversation with potential hires to see if the person can exchange ideas with him, and if they fit into a culture of creativity and curiosity.

Martin suggests searching the company to find out about the principals, how they think, and what their culture is. And then search yourself to see if there are any red flags.

Any other suggestions? We’d love to hear from you.

Send us an email or an audio comment to [email protected], join the FIR Google+ Community, join the Inside PR Google+ Community, join the Inside PR Facebook group, leave us a comment here, message us @inside_pr on Twitter, or connect with Gini DietrichJoseph Thornley, and Martin Waxman on Twitter.

And we have a favor to ask: If you like this podcast, please rate us on iTunes.

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Thank you to the people behind Inside PR.

Our theme music was created by Damon de SzegheoRoger Dey is our announcer.

Inside PR is produced by Joseph Thornley.

Inside PR 422: The Business of Podcasting, YouTube, and More

It’s the last week of summer and Joe, Martin, and I are ready to read some books. We hope you enjoyed our first installment of book club…and will participate in future events.

This week, we discuss the business of podcasting, how to use YouTube with the audio shows, and more.

But first, this week’s #IPRMustKnows:

  1. Podcasting Embraces a New Era of Cool.

  2. Facebook is Eating YouTube’s Lunch When it Comes to Video Views and Sharing.

  3. Is There Enough Benefit to Putting Podcasts on YouTube?

We also talk about the Four Great Canadian Marketing and PR Podcasts (plus one American, who is an honorary Canadian), and blogging’s bad rap from Alison Garwood Jones.

Then we answer a comment from John Kouten, the CEO of JFK Communications.

Listened to 415.

I have: FB, twitter, Linked In.  However I rarely post and rarely follow.

I am unsure about Goggle+

My problem is I don’t know how to find the time to use these channels as I am an agency principal.  I have sales, operations, HR and other time killers.

Any advice?

We give John some advice, which works for anyone in PR—executive, business owner, or not.

And, if you’d like to participate in next month’s IPR Book Club, leave us a comment here on what you’d like to read and we’ll add to our pile!

We’d love to hear from you.

Send us an email or an audio comment to [email protected], join the FIR Google+ Community, join the Inside PR Google+ Community, join the Inside PR Facebook group, leave us a comment here, message us @inside_pr on Twitter, or connect with Gini DietrichJoseph Thornley, and Martin Waxman on Twitter.

And we have a favor to ask: If you like this podcast, please rate us on iTunes.

******************************************************************

Thank you to the people behind Inside PR.

Our theme music was created by Damon de SzegheoRoger Dey is our announcer.

Inside PR is produced by Joseph Thornley.

Inside PR 420: Neville Hobson Hangs Up His Mic

This week, we have something special: Joe’s interview with Neville Hobson, co-host of the Hobson & Holtz Report and one of the first PR podcasters.

But first, our #InsidePRMustKnow segment.

Martin: The social news distribution space is getting a little more crowded. Facebook’s adding a Twitteresque app to let publishers send out breaking news alerts.

Joe: An academic study shows that what works for marketing – good SERP – also will affect voting decisions in elections. Something for us all to be aware of and vigilant about. Also, helps understand the concern of European authorities over the dominant share of search held there by Google.

Gini: How do you drive more traffic to a podcast? Eden Spodek, who’s launching her own podcast in a few weeks, suggests posting the audio and an image to YouTube and Gini tried that. We’ll let you know what happens.

Now onto Joe’s conversation with Neville …

As you’ve probably heard, Neville is leaving the FIR Network after 10 years and tells us he’s going to be focusing on creating more written content. In a wide-ranging discussion, he takes us on a journey that begins with the early days of podcasting, or as he calls it ‘home brew radio’. Neville tells stories about what he’s observed and learned along the way. He mentions some of the people who inspired him and shares his thoughts on what makes a podcaster great (hint – curiosity).

And speaking of podcasting… Just a reminder that we kick off our #InsidePRBookClub next week with a discussion of The Business of Podcasting by Donna Papacosta and Steve Lubetkin. We hope you’ll read it and share your thoughts.

We’d love to hear from you.

Send us an email or an audio comment to [email protected], join the FIR Google+ Community, join the Inside PR Google+ Community, join the Inside PR Facebook group, leave us a comment here, message us @inside_pr on Twitter, or connect with Gini DietrichJoseph Thornley, and Martin Waxman on Twitter.

And we have a favor to ask: If you like this podcast, please rate us on iTunes.

******************************************************************

Thank you to the people behind Inside PR.

Our theme music was created by Damon de SzegheoRoger Dey is our announcer.

Inside PR is produced by Joseph Thornley.

Inside PR 419: The Internet is Dead

In this week’s edition of #IPRMustKnow, we discuss:

And the main topic of this week’s show…

With the news of Zirtual closing shop, seemingly overnight, Gawker taking down stories, the Reddit interim CEO stepping down based on the social media mob, and journalists writing stories that just aren’t based in fact, Vox is claiming the Internet is dead.

Here is what they have to say:

What links these seemingly dissimilar stories is a very basic fear — the idea that the internet as we knew it, the internet of five or 10 or 20 years ago, is going away as surely as print media, replaced by a new internet that reimagines personal identity as something easily commodified, that plays less on the desire for information or thoughtfulness than it does the desire for a quick jolt of emotion.

It’s an internet driven not by human beings, but by content, at all costs. And none of us — neither media professionals, nor readers — can stop it. Every single one of us is building it every single day.

We encourage you to read the Vox piece, listen to the episode, and come back here to discuss.

We’d love to hear from you.

Send us an email or an audio comment to [email protected], join the FIR Google+ Community, join the Inside PR Google+ Community, join the Inside PR Facebook group, leave us a comment here, message us @inside_pr on Twitter, or connect with Gini DietrichJoseph Thornley, and Martin Waxman on Twitter.

And we have a favor to ask: If you like this podcast, please rate us on iTunes.

******************************************************************

Thank you to the people behind Inside PR.

Our theme music was created by Damon de SzegheoRoger Dey is our announcer.

Inside PR is produced by Joseph Thornley.

Inside PR 417: Ezra Klein’s vision of the future of media

On this week’s Inside PR podcast, Martin Waxman, Gini Dietrich and I talk about three #IPRMustKnows. All three involve either Google or Facebook and two relate to video. Listen to the podcast for news about Facebook tools for video publishers, a new YouTube mobile player and the next steps in gutting Google+.

Our main discussion item was suggested to us by Robert Carver (Thanks Robert!). Recently, Ezra Klein peered into the future and came up with the question, Is the Media Becoming a Wire Service? Klein’s article is thought provoking and a worthwhile read. He posits a tradeoff between greater reach and an erosion in innovation. Gini, Martin and I are drawn into Klein’s vision of the future with both enthusiasm and trepidation. Give it a listen and then tell us what you think? Is Klein’s vision of future journalism something that you think will come to pass?

We’d love to hear from you.

Send us an email or an audio comment to [email protected], join the FIR Google+ Community, join the Inside PR Google+ Community, join the Inside PR Facebook group, leave us a comment here, message us @inside_pr on Twitter, or connect with Gini DietrichJoseph Thornley, and Martin Waxman on Twitter.

And we have a favor to ask: if you like this podcast, please rate us on iTunes.

******************************************************************

Thank you to the people behind Inside PR.

Our theme music was created by Damon de SzegheoRoger Dey is our announcer.

Inside PR is produced by Joseph Thornley.

Inside PR 416: All the news you can get on Facebook and Twitter

Martin here and I hope you don’t mind if I start with a plug. I’m heading to SXSWV2V in Las Vegas to be a mentor and on a panel called, The Best City in the World May Not Be a City at All. We’ll be talking about what it takes to make the kind of community people flock to live and work in and whether that’s a physical location, online or a creative combination of the two.

Now onto the show with our #IPRMustKnow for this week:

Meerkat introduces Cameo – a new feature that lets you hand off your livestream to other users and offer another angle on a real-time video story.

Twitter keeps getting better at paid promotion and rolls out campaign insights and audience personas to all users. 

Facebook changes its settings and allows people to choose which friends and brands they want to see more of in their newsfeed. Have you adjusted yours?

In our main topic, we discuss a recent Pew Study that focuses on how and where we discover and consume news. Turns out 63% of people on both Facebook and Twitter get news from those platforms. Which helps explain why social networks continue to evolve into media companies.

One stat that stood out: just over 60 per cent of millennials get political news from Facebook and 37 per cent from local TV. The numbers are reversed for boomers. What does that mean? Well, don’t think that millennials will switch to TV when they become ‘mature adults’ – because, hey, that’s what adults are supposed to do. It’s yet another wake up call to mainstream media – and PR – on the need to evolve and transform.

And while we’re on the subject of media, do you get a newspaper delivered to your door? If so, how often do you read it? Where do you go first for information and news – social platforms or MSM?

We’d love to hear from you.

Send us an email or an audio comment to [email protected], join the FIR Google+ Community, join the Inside PR Google+ Community, join the Inside PR Facebook group, leave us a comment here, message us @inside_pr on Twitter, or connect with Gini DietrichJoseph Thornley, and Martin Waxman on Twitter.

And we have a favor to ask: if you like this podcast, please rate us on iTunes.

******************************************************************

Thank you to the people behind Inside PR.

Our theme music was created by Damon de SzegheoRoger Dey is our announcer.

Inside PR is produced by Joseph Thornley.

 

Inside PR 415: You Talkin’ to Me?

In this week’s edition of #IPRMustKnow, which you, our dear listeners, seem to like, we discuss:

  1. Yelp traffic could decline for the first time ever after Google changed its search algorithm.
  2. Web design is dead…and what that means for your use of social networks and mobile platforms.
  3. Instagram not only plans to compete with Twitter, but to beat them by sharing timely photos from world events.

And in the main topic of this week’s show:

About a week ago, a PR firm executive wrote a column titled, “PR Agency Leads Should Only Follow On Twitter.”

(We are not going to prove a link because we don’t want to give the story any SEO juice, but it’s pretty easy to find if you want to read it.)

You see the author, a lead at a very well-known firm, thinks those of us who run agencies should only follow people on Twitter—not engage, respond, or even tweet.

This is what she says:

Don’t get me wrong: I believe wholeheartedly in clients and influencers using Twitter to get the word out. But what I can’t for the life of me wrap my head around is why anyone in an agency — especially those working in PR, whose core responsibility is to help clients protect and amplify their brand voice — believes they should be out front adding their two cents proactively or using it as a publicity engine for their own means.

We discuss why this is completely short-sighted and bad advice for the leaders of any organization, not just those of PR firms.

Send us an email or an audio comment to [email protected], join the FIR Google+ Community, join the Inside PR Google+ Community, join the Inside PR Facebook group, leave us a comment here, message us @inside_pr on Twitter, or connect with Gini DietrichJoseph Thornley, and Martin Waxman on Twitter.

And we have a favor to ask: if you like this podcast, please rate us on iTunes.

******************************************************************

Thank you to the people behind Inside PR.

Our theme music was created by Damon de SzegheoRoger Dey is our announcer.

Inside PR is produced by Joseph Thornley.

Inside PR 414: End of Days for Human Content Creators?

This week on Inside PR, Martin Waxman, Gini Dietrich and I give you three #IPRMustKnows plus we talk about

First, the #IPRMustKnows:

  1. Meerkat introduces and embeddable player. Now you can put your streaming media on your own site.
  2. Yeplive joins the streaming video field. And it lets you shoot your video in landscape mode, unlike Meerkat and Persicope which serve up your videos in portrait mode. You can get the Yep Live app in the iOS and Play stores.
  3. Google “began remotely installing audio-snooping code that was capable of listening to users.” The code supports Google’s hotword feature that enables voice commands. This is the kind of feature you need to be aware of. Remember what you enable on your device because always-on monitoring has become a “feature” of our lives.

In our main discussion this week, we turn our attention to the increasing role of algorithms and computer code not only to shape the distribution of news, but also to create content. Do you know when your news is generated by a person or generated by an algorithm? This is the type of development that strongly divides people. And it is a discussion that we’ll surely be having much more in the future.

We’d love to hear what you think.

Send us an email or an audio comment to [email protected], join the FIR Google+ Community, join the Inside PR Google+ Community, join the Inside PR Facebook group, leave us a comment here, message us @inside_pr on Twitter, or connect with Gini DietrichJoseph Thornley, and Martin Waxman on Twitter.

And we have a favor to ask: if you like this podcast, please rate us on iTunes.

******************************************************************

Thank you to the people behind Inside PR.

Our theme music was created by Damon de SzegheoRoger Dey is our announcer.

Inside PR is produced by Joseph Thornley.

Inside PR 413: A Swift Response to Intellectual Property

This week we put on our pop music hats and talk about intellectual property and Taylor Swift.

But first #IPRMustKnow:

Google launches YouTube Newswire to verify breaking video news in real-time. Is the newswire about to be crowdsourced?

Speaking of news…Twitter announces Project Lightning, a curated source for news and major events, assembled by the Twitter media team (i.e. people not algorithms).

And…NYTimes temporarily blocks its homepage access from employees in an effort to help journalists better understand their readers who are accessing their news via smartphones and tablets and not from the virtual front page.

Taylor versus Goliath?

Taylor Swift stood up for independent artists and their right to be paid. And Apple Music, which was offering a three-month free trial to users subsidized by not paying royalties to artists, backed down. Swift argued that she personally doesn’t need the money, but independent artists shouldn’t have to lose the equivalent of one-quarter of their income to a profitable corporation like Apple.

Apple is an organization that has gone a long way to define its brand and design aesthetic and cultivated a loyal following. The company quickly realized that when people are deciding which music service to subscribe to, they’d rather be on the side that plays fair, not the one that’s seen to be taking advantage of artists.

Apple made its about-face after listening and being open to Taylor Swift’s POV. Swift is showing herself as a powerful social media force. And she’s smart about the way she does her own PR by creating opportunities for fans and building loyalty and engagement.

The bottom line: You may have to give away some content for free but profitable organizations should value intellectual property and not think of it as license to make money on the backs of creators.

And check out Gini’s rant on the high cost of the free economy!

We’d love to hear what you think.

Send us an email or an audio comment to [email protected], join the FIR Google+ Community, join the Inside PR Google+ Community, join the Inside PR Facebook group, leave us a comment here, message us @inside_pr on Twitter, or connect with Gini DietrichJoseph Thornley, and Martin Waxman on Twitter.

And we have a favor to ask: if you like this podcast, please rate us on iTunes.

******************************************************************

Thank you to the people behind Inside PR.

Our theme music was created by Damon de SzegheoRoger Dey is our announcer.

Inside PR is produced by Ashlea McGrath.

Inside PR 412: The Industry that Must Change

Though we recorded this the afternoon of game six, the Blackhawks won the Stanley Cup that evening!

Go Blackhawks!

The parade was yesterday and more than two million people descended on Soldier Field (which only seats 61,500) to celebrate with the team.

There is something to say about Chicago and its sports teams: We love them here.

This week, we’ve added a new feature on the show called IPR Must Knows. It will be an ongoing feature and we’d love for you to participate. Use the hashtag #iprmustknow if there is a story you’d like us to cover. We’ll add it to our list!

And this week…

IPR Must Knows

The Industry Must Change

The meat of our show is about the industry that needs to change. And it’s not just PR, it’s advertising, too.

On Medium, Gareth Kay talks about the advertising agency model that is dying and about it’s evolution.

On his own blog, Stephen Waddington talks about the PR industry and the lack of evolution.

Both of these, of course, are not new conversations, but we acknowledge there has been a remarkable period of change and it’s time for everyone to grow, innovate, and produce.

This could mean we recommend things where we don’t have expertise. For instance, communicators may recommend paid media. Advertisers may recommend inbound marketing. And marketers may recommend earned media.

The evolution is not only about incorporating new tactics and new technologies, but also about doing what’s best for the organization…not what’s in your own best interest.

We’d love to hear what you think.

Send us an email or an audio comment to [email protected], join the FIR Google+ Community, join the Inside PR Google+ Community, join the Inside PR Facebook group, leave us a comment here, message us @inside_pr on Twitter, or connect with Gini DietrichJoseph Thornley, and Martin Waxman on Twitter.

And we have a favor to ask: if you like this podcast, please rate us on iTunes.

******************************************************************

Thank you to the people behind Inside PR.

Our theme music was created by Damon de SzegheoRoger Dey is our announcer.

Inside PR is produced by Ashlea McGrath.