Inside PR 4.24: The Networking Leeches

It’s the end of the third quarter and it’s time to get serious about the end of the year. There are, after all, only 12 more Fridays until Christmas (as Buddy the Elf likes to remind us).

Before we get to the topic of the day (networking and “can I pick your brain?”), let’s talk #IPRMustKnow:

And now, the topic of the day: Networking leeches.

A couple of weeks ago, the New York Times ran an article titled, “How Not to Be a Networking Leech: Tips for Seeking Professional Advice.”

It gave better advice than, “Stop asking me to pick my brain!”, which tends to be the reaction from nearly every professional services provider in the world.

Some of our favorite tips include:

  • Go with a prepared list of questions;
  • Don’t argue about their advice or point out why it wouldn’t work for you; and
  • Don’t ask for intellectual property or materials.

Martin also adds his own tip that you’ll be sure to want to hear. And, I wrote about this on Spin Sucks and the comments are very interesting. So go check out Thirteen Ways to Get the Best Out of Networking,” if you are so inclined.

Send us an email or an audio comment to [email protected], join the FIR Google+ Community, join the Inside PR Google+ Community, join the Inside PR Facebook group, leave us a comment here, message us @inside_pr on Twitter, or connect with Gini DietrichJoseph Thornley, and Martin Waxman on Twitter.

And we have a favor to ask: If you like this podcast, please rate us on iTunes.

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Thank you to the people behind Inside PR.

Our theme music was created by Damon de SzegheoRoger Dey is our announcer.

Inside PR is produced by Joseph Thornley.

Inside PR 422: The Business of Podcasting, YouTube, and More

It’s the last week of summer and Joe, Martin, and I are ready to read some books. We hope you enjoyed our first installment of book club…and will participate in future events.

This week, we discuss the business of podcasting, how to use YouTube with the audio shows, and more.

But first, this week’s #IPRMustKnows:

  1. Podcasting Embraces a New Era of Cool.

  2. Facebook is Eating YouTube’s Lunch When it Comes to Video Views and Sharing.

  3. Is There Enough Benefit to Putting Podcasts on YouTube?

We also talk about the Four Great Canadian Marketing and PR Podcasts (plus one American, who is an honorary Canadian), and blogging’s bad rap from Alison Garwood Jones.

Then we answer a comment from John Kouten, the CEO of JFK Communications.

Listened to 415.

I have: FB, twitter, Linked In.  However I rarely post and rarely follow.

I am unsure about Goggle+

My problem is I don’t know how to find the time to use these channels as I am an agency principal.  I have sales, operations, HR and other time killers.

Any advice?

We give John some advice, which works for anyone in PR—executive, business owner, or not.

And, if you’d like to participate in next month’s IPR Book Club, leave us a comment here on what you’d like to read and we’ll add to our pile!

We’d love to hear from you.

Send us an email or an audio comment to [email protected], join the FIR Google+ Community, join the Inside PR Google+ Community, join the Inside PR Facebook group, leave us a comment here, message us @inside_pr on Twitter, or connect with Gini DietrichJoseph Thornley, and Martin Waxman on Twitter.

And we have a favor to ask: If you like this podcast, please rate us on iTunes.

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Thank you to the people behind Inside PR.

Our theme music was created by Damon de SzegheoRoger Dey is our announcer.

Inside PR is produced by Joseph Thornley.

Inside PR 419: The Internet is Dead

In this week’s edition of #IPRMustKnow, we discuss:

And the main topic of this week’s show…

With the news of Zirtual closing shop, seemingly overnight, Gawker taking down stories, the Reddit interim CEO stepping down based on the social media mob, and journalists writing stories that just aren’t based in fact, Vox is claiming the Internet is dead.

Here is what they have to say:

What links these seemingly dissimilar stories is a very basic fear — the idea that the internet as we knew it, the internet of five or 10 or 20 years ago, is going away as surely as print media, replaced by a new internet that reimagines personal identity as something easily commodified, that plays less on the desire for information or thoughtfulness than it does the desire for a quick jolt of emotion.

It’s an internet driven not by human beings, but by content, at all costs. And none of us — neither media professionals, nor readers — can stop it. Every single one of us is building it every single day.

We encourage you to read the Vox piece, listen to the episode, and come back here to discuss.

We’d love to hear from you.

Send us an email or an audio comment to [email protected], join the FIR Google+ Community, join the Inside PR Google+ Community, join the Inside PR Facebook group, leave us a comment here, message us @inside_pr on Twitter, or connect with Gini DietrichJoseph Thornley, and Martin Waxman on Twitter.

And we have a favor to ask: If you like this podcast, please rate us on iTunes.

******************************************************************

Thank you to the people behind Inside PR.

Our theme music was created by Damon de SzegheoRoger Dey is our announcer.

Inside PR is produced by Joseph Thornley.

Inside PR 415: You Talkin’ to Me?

In this week’s edition of #IPRMustKnow, which you, our dear listeners, seem to like, we discuss:

  1. Yelp traffic could decline for the first time ever after Google changed its search algorithm.
  2. Web design is dead…and what that means for your use of social networks and mobile platforms.
  3. Instagram not only plans to compete with Twitter, but to beat them by sharing timely photos from world events.

And in the main topic of this week’s show:

About a week ago, a PR firm executive wrote a column titled, “PR Agency Leads Should Only Follow On Twitter.”

(We are not going to prove a link because we don’t want to give the story any SEO juice, but it’s pretty easy to find if you want to read it.)

You see the author, a lead at a very well-known firm, thinks those of us who run agencies should only follow people on Twitter—not engage, respond, or even tweet.

This is what she says:

Don’t get me wrong: I believe wholeheartedly in clients and influencers using Twitter to get the word out. But what I can’t for the life of me wrap my head around is why anyone in an agency — especially those working in PR, whose core responsibility is to help clients protect and amplify their brand voice — believes they should be out front adding their two cents proactively or using it as a publicity engine for their own means.

We discuss why this is completely short-sighted and bad advice for the leaders of any organization, not just those of PR firms.

Send us an email or an audio comment to [email protected], join the FIR Google+ Community, join the Inside PR Google+ Community, join the Inside PR Facebook group, leave us a comment here, message us @inside_pr on Twitter, or connect with Gini DietrichJoseph Thornley, and Martin Waxman on Twitter.

And we have a favor to ask: if you like this podcast, please rate us on iTunes.

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Thank you to the people behind Inside PR.

Our theme music was created by Damon de SzegheoRoger Dey is our announcer.

Inside PR is produced by Joseph Thornley.

Inside PR 412: The Industry that Must Change

Though we recorded this the afternoon of game six, the Blackhawks won the Stanley Cup that evening!

Go Blackhawks!

The parade was yesterday and more than two million people descended on Soldier Field (which only seats 61,500) to celebrate with the team.

There is something to say about Chicago and its sports teams: We love them here.

This week, we’ve added a new feature on the show called IPR Must Knows. It will be an ongoing feature and we’d love for you to participate. Use the hashtag #iprmustknow if there is a story you’d like us to cover. We’ll add it to our list!

And this week…

IPR Must Knows

The Industry Must Change

The meat of our show is about the industry that needs to change. And it’s not just PR, it’s advertising, too.

On Medium, Gareth Kay talks about the advertising agency model that is dying and about it’s evolution.

On his own blog, Stephen Waddington talks about the PR industry and the lack of evolution.

Both of these, of course, are not new conversations, but we acknowledge there has been a remarkable period of change and it’s time for everyone to grow, innovate, and produce.

This could mean we recommend things where we don’t have expertise. For instance, communicators may recommend paid media. Advertisers may recommend inbound marketing. And marketers may recommend earned media.

The evolution is not only about incorporating new tactics and new technologies, but also about doing what’s best for the organization…not what’s in your own best interest.

We’d love to hear what you think.

Send us an email or an audio comment to [email protected], join the FIR Google+ Community, join the Inside PR Google+ Community, join the Inside PR Facebook group, leave us a comment here, message us @inside_pr on Twitter, or connect with Gini DietrichJoseph Thornley, and Martin Waxman on Twitter.

And we have a favor to ask: if you like this podcast, please rate us on iTunes.

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Thank you to the people behind Inside PR.

Our theme music was created by Damon de SzegheoRoger Dey is our announcer.

Inside PR is produced by Ashlea McGrath.

 

Inside PR 406: All Things News

It’s been a big couple of weeks in the worlds of social media and journalism.

Periscope. Meerkat. Facebook hosting news sites. More snow in Ottawa. Oh my!

Facebook is in discussion with several media outlets to move their news into the social network. Facebook is clearly tired of people leaving their site to read news on other sites so they have gone to several news outlets to see if they can strike a deal to have content live there.

The New York Times is considering it for two reasons: They will gain new readers, even if it’s not on their own site, and Facebook has offered a revenue share from advertising.

It’s interesting, to say the least, but we are in disagreement about what this could mean and how it might affect readership, owned content, and access to data.

Nearly two weeks ago, Twitter launched a Meerkat competitor with Periscope. So, within the last month, livestreaming from your bed, the street, or your office has become an overnight sensation.

We’ve tested both while recording Inside PR. Martin has tried it from bed (accidentally). Joe has tried it from his office. And our mutual friend, Eric Tung, even tried it on the airplane.

Both subjects should be watched with careful consideration at what they mean for communicators.

What do you think?

We’d love to hear from you.

Send us an email or an audio comment to [email protected], join the FIR Google+ Community, join the Inside PR Google+ Community, join the Inside PR Facebook group, leave us a comment here, message us @inside_pr on Twitter, or connect with Gini DietrichJoseph Thornley, and Martin Waxman on Twitter.

And we have a favor to ask: if you like this podcast, please rate us on iTunes.

******************************************************************

Thank you to the people behind Inside PR.

Our theme music was created by Damon de SzegheoRoger Dey is our announcer.

Inside PR is produced by Ashlea McGrath.

Inside PR 403: PR Has an HR Issue

Yes, PR has an HR problem.

There are two things at play:

  1. A recent Bloom & Gross study shows there still is a salary gap between men and women in the PR industry…sometimes as much as $42,000 per year.
  2. A CIPR study shows there is a major threat to the PR industry because of the lack of digital skills at the very senior levels.

On the first, we are an industry that is female-dominated. It’s anywhere between 73 and 85 percent female. And yet…

Most of the most senior-level positions, particularly inside PR firms, are held by men.

As male business leaders, I challenged Martin and Joe to think about how they hire—and compensate—their female employees. It led to a nice discussion.

The other issue at play is the lack of evolution in the PR industry, particularly at the senior levels.

Paul Sutton shared the following screen grab in his blog post, “Experience Can’t Be More Than Skill in PR. Can it?

Proper PR

The industry, has a whole, has a very low barrier to entry. That’s a problem. It’s also a problem that anyone with a computer considers themselves a communicator.

And now we have to contend with the digital communications experts that all are younger than 30 years old because the most experienced practitioners haven’t learned the new skills necessary to take the industry to a new place.

The conversation gets a little heated—not because we disagree, necessarily—but because we are passionate on the topic.

What do you think?

Send us an email or an audio comment to [email protected], join the FIR Google+ Community, join the Inside PR Google+ Community, join the Inside PR Facebook group, leave us a comment here, message us @inside_pr on Twitter, or connect with Gini DietrichJoseph Thornley, and Martin Waxman on Twitter.

We’d ask one favor of you. If you like this podcast, please rate us on iTunes.

******************************************************************

Thank you to the people behind Inside PR.

Our theme music was created by Damon de SzegheoRoger Dey is our announcer.

Inside PR is produced by Ashlea McGrath.

Inside PR 400: The Social Media Mob

Just a little more than a year after Justine Sacco sent the ill-fated, “Going to Africa. Hope I don’t get AIDS. Just kidding. I’m White!” tweet, The New York Times Magazine wrote an in-depth piece on her (and others who have suffered the social media mob) to see where she is now and how this has affected her livelihood.

There has been a lot of subsequent coverage on the topic:

It’s an interesting look at the social media, whether the crime fits the punishment, and how we might all need to chill.

Jon Ronson, the article’s author, even researched how long it has been since society allowed public shamings in much the same way we ridicule online (the 14th Century).

The conversation turns from the social media mob and online lynchings to how we can use humor in our social media efforts without coming across as clueless and insensitive as the Sacco tweet.

Her point was that the tweet was so ridiculous, she couldn’t imagine anyone taking it seriously. She was making a satirical remark on the bubble we live in in North America. But what she learned is, unless you’re Louis CK or South Park, satire doesn’t work so well in 140 characters.

It’s an interesting world we live in. Many business leaders are scared of what happens when an employee doesn’t think and sends a tweet like this, or when a customer is unhappy and doesn’t get his way. There are, of course, ways to deal with critics, but Joe poses the question, “Does it make sense in some extreme cases to go completely dark?”

What do you think?

Send us an email or an audio comment to [email protected], join the FIR Google+ Community, join the Inside PR Google+ Community, join the Inside PR Facebook group, leave us a comment here, message us @inside_pr on Twitter, or connect with Gini DietrichJoseph Thornley, and Martin Waxman on Twitter.

We’d ask one favor of you. If you like this podcast, please rate us on iTunes.

******************************************************************

Thank you to the people behind Inside PR.

Our theme music was created by Damon de SzegheoRoger Dey is our announcer.

Inside PR is produced by Ashlea McGrath.

Inside PR 396: Teens on Social Media

On Medium a couple of weeks ago, a teenager named Andrew Watts wrote a piece called A Teenager’s View on Social Media. To say it created a conversation is putting it mildly.

Matthew Ingram at Gigaom picked it up…and then he wrote a second piece after Danah Boyd, a sociologist who focuses on how young people use social media, wrote a retort in the comments.

She provided some criticism on how we (human beings) group people into buckets for marketing purposes. We like to generalize. There is a reason stereotypes exist.

During the time that conversation was happening, Andrew Watts published a second article on what teens think about some of the other social networks…the ones he didn’t include in his first piece.

The four pieces are the topic of our conversation today.

We talk about:

  • Storytelling and how this young man’s piece picked up steam because it was interesting and personal;
  • YikYak and the advantage of smaller social communities;
  • How communicators must be open-minded to how different generations use social media and do some testing of our own;
  • Whether there is a difference between a teenager and a college student (which Andrew Watts is);
  • Why it’s important not to generalize;
  • How social media allows us to find direct communication with like-minded people around the globe; and
  • Different perspectives from our own community among those who have teenagers.

Martin ends the discussion by leaving it in your hands. He asks, “Are we moving into the next phase of social media?”

Many of you listen to us on iTunes and it would be great if you could leave us a review.

Send us an email or an audio comment to [email protected], join the FIR Google+ Community, join the Inside PR Google+ Community, join the Inside PR Facebook group, leave us a comment here, message us @inside_pr on Twitter, or connect with Gini DietrichJoseph Thornley, and Martin Waxman on Twitter.

******************************************************************

Thank you to the people behind Inside PR.

Our theme music was created by Damon de SzegheoRoger Dey is our announcer.

Inside PR is produced by Ashlea McGrath.

Inside PR 394: The 2015 Public Relations Predictions

It’s the last episode of 2014 and we couldn’t let the year end without giving you our public relations predictions for 2015.

Before we get to those predictions, though, Joe talks about a few changes at Google, including updates to the Customer Journey to Online Purchase. For communicators, this is pretty interesting to check out because it helps you determine how a customer might make a purchase decision and how you can help them along through the process. No longer do you have to guess at the types of content that will help them make a decision.

The trends we discuss are:

  • The continual integration of PESO (paid, earned, shared, and owned media);
  • Return of big ideas a la West Jet Holiday Miracle; and
  • The quest for scale, both for organizations and for content.

Of course, we talk about why we’ve chosen each of these and what they mean for the industry. They also all seem to intertwine with one another, which was not planned. We didn’t discuss beforehand which trend we had each chosen. Serendipity!

And, before you begin your holiday cheer, please join us in making fun of Martin Waxman for always saying, “At triple W insidepr dot C A” instead of just “insidepr dot CA.”

Happy Holidays to all of you! We wish you a great start to 2015 and look forward to hanging out in your ears for another year.

We’d love to hear what you think.

Send us an email or an audio comment to [email protected], join the FIR Google+ Community, join the Inside PR Google+ Community, join the Inside PR Facebook group, leave us a comment here, message us @inside_pr on Twitter, or connect with Gini DietrichJoseph Thornley, and Martin Waxman on Twitter.

******************************************************************

Thank you to the people behind Inside PR.

Our theme music was created by Damon de SzegheoRoger Dey is our announcer.

Inside PR is produced by Ashlea McGrath.