It’s about disclosure, stupid!

On this week’s episode of the Inside PR podcast: The biggest change to WordPress in ten years; the Guardian decides good enough video really is good enough; and a teachable moment in marketing ethics. It’s about disclosure, stupid!

WordPress 5 with Gutenberg

WordPress users have something big to look forward to – the release of WordPress 5. WordPress published an update forecasting that WordPress 5 will be released as early as August. Why is WordPress 5 such a big deal? Because it will incorporate the new Gutenberg editing system.

Gutenberg will be the first significant change in WordPress’ core editing dashboard in ten years. And when it is introduced, WordPress users will have, for the first time, a true WYSIWYG interface that will enable them to create, format and arrange their content as they create it, seeing the results as they make the changes. As long time WordPress users, this is something that we have been looking forward to. August can’t come soon enough.

Sometime good enough video is good enough

We know that video is the most engaging of social objects. But we also know that it takes a lot of work to produce highly polished “professional-looking” videos. Digiday reports that The Guardian has adjusted their approach to video on Instagram. They concluded that the uptake of their videos does not justify the high cost of production of highly polished videos. On the other hand, they also noticed that less polished videos were being viewed as often as higher quality, higher cost of production videos. So, from now on, the Guardian is producing less polished videos such as 12 to 15 screen “explainers.”

We think there is a lesson here for all of us – sometimes it makes sense to aim for “good enough” to achieve your objectives. If you can achieve your objective at lower cost, doesn’t it just make sense to do this?

If you fail to disclose, this could be you

A few weeks ago we talked about the less-than-transparent disclosure made by matte story distributors and publishers. This week, Buzzfeed threw daylight on another lapse in disclosure. They highlighted the behaviour of one marketing company that routinely places bylined articles in online news outlets such as Forbes and Entrepreneur without disclosing that references to their clients within the articles are in fact references to clients of the marketing firm.

Nobody is served well by this practice. Not the client. Not the publisher. And not the marketing firm. Just one more reminder to us all that trust is built over time, but can be lost with a single action. Let’s remember, when in doubt, disclose.

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It’s your turn.

We’d love to know what you think about the topics we discussed as well as your suggestions for questions you’d like answered or topics for future shows.

Please rate us on Apple Podcasts

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Thank you to the people behind Inside PR.

Our theme music was created by Damon de SzegheoRoger Dey is our announcer. Inside PR is produced by Joseph Thornley.

Creative Commons Licence
Inside PR 513 It’s about disclosure, stupid! by Joseph Thornley, Gini Dietrich, Martin Waxman is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Inside PR 499: Algorithms are as neutral as the people who write them

This week, we talk about the introduction of ethics into tech education, a move that’s long overdue. Could ethics in Tech turn on the concept, Do no harm?

Also: Facebook users are skewing older as younger people move to other platforms. Can geritol ads be far behind? And Google AMP Stories shows another platform moving to take advantage of the trend to package and present content as stories.

It’s your turn.

We’d love to know what you think about the topics we discussed as well as your suggestions for questions you’d like answered or topics for future shows.

#IPRMustKnow

Our hashtag is #IPRMustKnow. If you are tweeting or posting about the podcast, please include our hashtag so that we can find your post.

Please rate us on Apple Podcasts

We hope you like the podcast as much as we like making it for you. If you do, we have a favor to ask: If you like this podcast, please rate us on Apple Podcasts.

Subscribe on the podcast app of your choice

We’re trying to be wherever you want us to be. So, you can subscribe to Inside PR on the most popular podcast apps.

Thank you to the people behind Inside PR.

Our theme music was created by Damon de SzegheoRoger Dey is our announcer. Inside PR is produced by Joseph Thornley.

Creative Commons Licence
Inside PR 499 by Joseph Thornley, Gini Dietrich, Martin Waxman is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Inside PR 2.54: Live from Counselors Academy – talking about a PR imbroglio

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We’re on the road and face to face at Counselors Academy’s annual conference for PR leaders, where we’ll be doing the next two shows.

Joe leads off this week’s discussion with: the Burson-Marsteller / Facebook imbroglio.

Gini recaps her blog post and sets the scene.  BM had been working with media and bloggers to create a whisper campaign against Google and its social media platform.  The PR firm did not disclose the client.  After much speculation, Facebook admitted they were behind the program. BM issued a statement saying the initiative contravened its policies but did not come out and apologize. PRSA was quoted in a story saying that since only 14 people in the agency are members, they’re the only ones who can be held responsible for the ethics breach.

The story reminds Martin of a classic ‘50s film, The Sweet Smell of Success, with Tony Curtis as a less than honest press agent who conducts a whisper campaign of his own.

Joe says this is a challenge any firm faces. The story affects all PR and communications employees as well as the image of PR as a whole. What he finds most disturbing about BM’s response, is that they use misdirection to colour the perception of who’s responsible for the information.

Tom Garrity discusses the issue of reporters who jump over to PR. He suggests this is a good reminder to re-analyse how we look at and respond to social media in the marketplace. He references a survey his firm conducted in New Mexico that ranks PR and journalist as the lowest trusted professions.

Johna Burke asks what this invokes for agency proprietors as we create partnerships with clients and knowingly or unknowingly get caught up in the 24/7 news cycle.  What can we do internally to resolve and manage situations like this?

Joe responds that an ethics code is not good enough. Ethics should be job one, the core of an agency’s culture, how we treat ourselves and how we treat the outside world.

Martin tries to look at it from the other side: how a call from a high profile client could colour a firm’s perceptions of the assignment, and that it’s important to hold onto your ethics and beliefs and not get caught with stars in your eyes.

Gini wonders when your defences come up and you realize something like this is a lot like Watergate.

Lisa Gerber references the point at which a crisis is inflamed or diffused and how a minority can make the majority look bad. She thinks PRSA should come out with a stronger stand and not simply focus on its members.

Gini would like to see our profession held accountable like other industries.  Martin talks about how an industry-wide code of ethics that all organizations could sign would help establish professional standards… then gets off his high horse.

And that’s where this week’s podcast ends. We’d love to hear your comments on our topic, or any questions you may have.

Please send us an email or an audio comment to [email protected], join the Inside PR Facebook group, leave us a comment here, message us @inside_pr on Twitter, or connect with Gini DietrichJoe Thornley, and Martin Waxman on Twitter

Our theme music was created by Damon de SzegheoRoger Dey is our announcer.

This week’s episode was produced by Kristine Simpson.

Inside PR #108 – Tuesday, April 22, 2008

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Comments? Send us an email at [email protected], call us on the comment line on 206-600-4741, visit the Inside PR Blubrry site, or leave us a comment on the Inside PR show blog.

This week on Inside PR, Dave Jones, Martin Waxman and Julie Rusciolelli discuss when to and how to fire a client and welcome a comment from Joseph Thornley, continuing the ethics discussion.

Keith McArthur and Terry Fallis were unable to join the IPR gang this evening.

Show Notes

00:34 Dave introduces the show

01:35 Joseph Thornley leaves a comment discussing the low repute of PR practitioners and PR ethics.

03:56 Martin references The Sweet Smell of Success

04:10 Julie introduces the topic of Firing a Client

04:40 Julie goes over the four warning signs that you may have to fire your client:

1. Chemistry has gone flat 2. Unreasonable demands 3. ROI 4. Abusive Behavior

The IPR Panel discusses their experiences relating to firing clients

27:27 Dave asks the question: “How do you fire a client?”

28:43 Martin Mentions the word compunction

31:00 Dave concludes the show

Our Theme music is Streetwalker by CJacks, and is courtesy of the Podsafe Music Network; Roger Dey is our announcer.

This week’s episode of Inside PR was produced by Samantha Lovelace.

Inside PR #107 – Tuesday, April 15, 2008

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Comments? Send us an email at [email protected], call us on the comment line on 206-600-4741, visit the Inside PR Blubrry site, or leave us a comment on the Inside PR show blog.

This week on Inside PR, Terry Fallis, Dave Jones, Keith McArthur and Julie Rusciolelli talk about the use of social media in public relations, ethics and muse over the communications and legal fields. They welcome comments from Bob LeDrew, Michael O’Connor Clarke, Eden Spodek, Shel Holtz and Garen Stepanian.

Martin Waxman is away this week.

Show Notes

01:24 Dave introduces the show

01:30 Dave reads the comment about IPR 106 from Bob LeDrew. Bob is a member of the Thornley Fallis team in Ottawa and writes the Flack Life blog

03:11 Terry talks about taking IPR on the road

04:10 Michael O’Connor Clarke leaves a message about IPR 106. Michael is a member of the Thornley Fallis team in Toronto and writes Uninstalled. During his comment he refers to World of Ends and Doc Searls’ and David Weinberger’s theory on who owns the Internet

No one owns it.
Everyone can use it.
Anyone can improve it.

06:24 Michael does Inside Proper English: Metaphor V. Simile

09:32 Eden Spodek leaves a comment regarding the importance of understanding the principles of social media before applying them in a client involved environment. Eden hails from bargainista.ca

12:17 Terry mentions the importance of strategy over tactics

12:45 Dave talks about the missuses of social media tools

14:33 Keith introduces the comment from Shel Holtz and his opinion on ethics in PR. This discussion is continued from IPR 103

19:23 Terry tells the listeners about Shel Holtz’ and Neville Hobson’s contribution to IPR

19:52 The ethics debate begins again

27:07 Julie introduces the comment from Garen Stepanian

27:54 Terry, Julie, Dave and Keith all talk to their experiences working with Lawyers current and past and the synergy between law and public relations

37:39 Terry Signs off

Our theme music is Streewalker by Cjacks and is courtesy of the Podsafe Music Network; Roger Dey is our announcer.

This week’s episode of Inside PR was produced by Samantha Lovelace.