A Very Un-American Approach to Privacy?

GDPR: Not yet in the rear view mirror

It’s six weeks since the effective date of GDPR. And many people think that, now that the flood of emails telling us about GDPR has ended, they won’t hear anything more about GDPR. Well, the reality is that we haven’t finished with GDPR. Not by a long shot. Many publishers and websites are going to be found to come up short on their implementation of GDPR. Some implemented opt-out instead of opt-in. Others buried their approvals out of plain sight. Some gave us an all or nothing approval. And all of these sites may find themselves being scrutinized in future. On top of that, California passed what may be the toughest privacy law in the United States, with an effective date of 2020. So, GDPR and privacy laws are not in our rearview mirror yet.

After Facebook: A return to a more diverse, more open online publishing ecosystem?

More evidence of the impact Facebook’s retreat from news had on publishers. Slate shared the 87% decline in traffic that they received from Facebook. But that’s not entirely the bad news it may seem at first blush. Because Slate didn’t go all-in on Facebook. They maintained a multi-channel promotion and publishing strategy – and that is serving them well now. Traffic to their home page is up. Traffic from sources other than Facebook are up and podcasts now constitute 25% of Slate’s revenue. Gini shares some of the stats for Spin Sucks – and they mirror what Slate revealed. Yes, Facebook referrals are down. But increases in traffic from other sources more than compensate for this loss. The bottom line — Facebook’s retreat from news has given a more diverse social system a chance to reestablish itself. And, as tough as the past 18 months have been, we’ve arrive in a much better place, a place that reminds us of the pre-Facebook open web.

Learn how to produce better videos the Instagram way

Have you been spending time on IGTV? Are you wondering how to produce better video to reach your friends and others? If you are, Instagram wants to help you. They have published a 48 page guide on how to produce better videos. And if equipment and software are a mystery to you, fear not. The Instagram guide provides tips on the apps and accessories you can get and use to make better video.

Audiograms really do work

Audiograms – the social posts that add video animations to soundclips – really do work. New data from audiogram provider Headliner showed that audiograms are much more effective at actively engaging your potential audience than are social posts with static images.

Linkworthy

It’s your turn.

We’d love to know what you think about the topics we discussed as well as your suggestions for questions you’d like answered or topics for future shows.

#IPRMustKnow

Our hashtag is #IPRMustKnow. If you are tweeting or posting about the podcast, please include our hashtag so that we can find your post.

Please rate us on Apple Podcasts

We hope you like the podcast as much as we like making it for you. If you do, we have a favor to ask: If you like this podcast, please rate us on Apple Podcasts.

Subscribe on the podcast app of your choice

We’re trying to be wherever you want us to be. So, you can subscribe to Inside PR on the most popular podcast apps.

Thank you to the people behind Inside PR.

Our theme music was created by Damon de SzegheoRoger Dey is our announcer. Inside PR is produced by Joseph Thornley.

Creative Commons Licence
Inside PR 512 by Joseph Thornley, Gini Dietrich, Martin Waxman is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Yes to greater transparency and more balance

Instagram released some information about how its algorithm determines what we see. Every individual has a unique feed. But all of us gain some insight from Instagram’s disclosure. A praiseworthy step toward greater transparency is how the social media sausage is made.

Last October, Facebook de-emphasized news in the Facebook Newsfeed. The bottom dropped out of many publishers’ traffic. New data from Chartbeat suggests that the system is returning to a healthier mix in which traffic to publishers from Google Search and direct has increased to provide a more balanced flow of traffic. Balance is good, in that it reduces the relative importance of any single platform.

Linkworthy

How Instagram’s algorithm works, Josh Constine

Mobile traffic rises for news sites, Christine Schmidt

It’s your turn.

We’d love to know what you think about the topics we discussed as well as your suggestions for questions you’d like answered or topics for future shows.

#IPRMustKnow

Our hashtag is #IPRMustKnow. If you are tweeting or posting about the podcast, please include our hashtag so that we can find your post.

Please rate us on Apple Podcasts

We hope you like the podcast as much as we like making it for you. If you do, we have a favor to ask: If you like this podcast, please rate us on Apple Podcasts.

Subscribe on the podcast app of your choice

We’re trying to be wherever you want us to be. So, you can subscribe to Inside PR on the most popular podcast apps.

Thank you to the people behind Inside PR.

Our theme music was created by Damon de SzegheoRoger Dey is our announcer. Inside PR is produced by Joseph Thornley.

Creative Commons Licence
Inside PR 509 by Joseph Thornley, Gini Dietrich, Martin Waxman is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Inside PR 453: Gini Dietrich knows how to promote content

Gini Dietrich, Martin Waxman and Joseph Thornley are back with another episode of the Inside PR podcastThis week, we discuss:

#IPRMustKnow

Instagram Stories continues to attract publisher interest. It could well be the combination of an engaging experience meeting a pre-existing audience.

Blab shut down, abruptly. Another sign that the psychology of scale has beat out the idea of sustainability for many business founders? For sure, it’s another reminder of the danger of placing your content eggs in any single shared space.

Unless you promote it, they will not come

Gini Dietrich schooled Joe on the importance and method of promoting content when she interviewed him for the Spin Sucks Inquisition. Within minutes of the post going live, Joe started to see mentions on his Twitter feed. Over the next week, he watched Gini promote the video. But beyond that, he watched Gini’s network chime in and share it. So, this week, we discuss Gini’s approach to promoting content, an approach which enables her to leverage a large and interested community of interest.

Listen to the end for this week’s outtake

You know that we’re not polished in our presentation. And if you heard us before the show is edited, you’d know that even better. But we genuinely like one another and have fun doing the show. Occasionally, this shows through in what we don’t include in the final version. Listen to the very end to get a taste of the stuff we leave on the cutting room floor.

We hope you like the podcast as much as we like making it for you.

Now it’s your turn.

We’d love to know what you think about the topics we discussed as well as your suggestions for questions you’d like answered or topics for future shows. Leave a comment on the blog, send us an email or an audio comment to [email protected]gmail.com, leave a comment on the Inside PR Facebook group or the FIR Podcast Network Facebook group, We’re also on Twitter. We’re @inside_pr or connect directly with Gini DietrichJoseph Thornley, and Martin WaxmanAnd we have a favor to ask: If you like this podcast, please rate us on iTunes.

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Thank you to the people behind Inside PR. Our theme music was created by Damon de SzegheoRoger Dey is our announcer. Inside PR is produced by Joseph Thornley.

Inside PR 415: You Talkin’ to Me?

In this week’s edition of #IPRMustKnow, which you, our dear listeners, seem to like, we discuss:

  1. Yelp traffic could decline for the first time ever after Google changed its search algorithm.
  2. Web design is dead…and what that means for your use of social networks and mobile platforms.
  3. Instagram not only plans to compete with Twitter, but to beat them by sharing timely photos from world events.

And in the main topic of this week’s show:

About a week ago, a PR firm executive wrote a column titled, “PR Agency Leads Should Only Follow On Twitter.”

(We are not going to prove a link because we don’t want to give the story any SEO juice, but it’s pretty easy to find if you want to read it.)

You see the author, a lead at a very well-known firm, thinks those of us who run agencies should only follow people on Twitter—not engage, respond, or even tweet.

This is what she says:

Don’t get me wrong: I believe wholeheartedly in clients and influencers using Twitter to get the word out. But what I can’t for the life of me wrap my head around is why anyone in an agency — especially those working in PR, whose core responsibility is to help clients protect and amplify their brand voice — believes they should be out front adding their two cents proactively or using it as a publicity engine for their own means.

We discuss why this is completely short-sighted and bad advice for the leaders of any organization, not just those of PR firms.

Send us an email or an audio comment to [email protected], join the FIR Google+ Community, join the Inside PR Google+ Community, join the Inside PR Facebook group, leave us a comment here, message us @inside_pr on Twitter, or connect with Gini DietrichJoseph Thornley, and Martin Waxman on Twitter.

And we have a favor to ask: if you like this podcast, please rate us on iTunes.

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Thank you to the people behind Inside PR.

Our theme music was created by Damon de SzegheoRoger Dey is our announcer.

Inside PR is produced by Joseph Thornley.